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dc.contributor.authorJagtap, SA-
dc.contributor.authorNair, MD-
dc.contributor.authorKambale, HJ-
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-10T03:28:42Z-
dc.date.available2017-03-10T03:28:42Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citation16 ,4;631-633en_US
dc.identifier.uri10.4103/0972-2327.120497-
dc.identifier.urihttp://dspace.sctimst.ac.in/jspui/handle/123456789/10495-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a rare chronic, progressive encephalitis affecting primarily children and young adults, caused by a persistent infection of immune resistant measles virus. The aim of the present study is to describe the clinical profile and natural history of patients with SSPE. Methods: We collected data of patients with SSPE during 2004-2010 who fulfilled Dyken's criteria. We analyzed demographical, clinical, electrophysiological, and imaging features. Results: Study included 34 patients, 26 (76.5%) males with age of onset from 3 to 31 years. Twenty one patients were below 15 years of age formed childhood SSPE and 13 above 15 years of age constituted adult onset group. 85.3% had low-socioeconomic status. Eleven received measles vaccination and seven were unvaccinated. 59.9% patients had measles history. Most common presenting symptom was scholastic backwardness (52.5%) followed by seizures (23.5%). Three patients each had cortical blindness, macular degeneration, decreased visual acuity, and optic atrophy. Electroencephalographic (EEG) showed long interval periodic complexes and cerebrospinal fluid anti-measles antibody was positive in all. Magnetic resonance imaging was done in 70.5% with was abnormal in 52.5%. Mean incubation period of SSPE after measles was 9.6 years. The follow-up duration was 1-10 years, (average of 2 years). Only one patient died from available data of follow-up, 9 were stable and 10 deteriorated in the form of progression of staging. Conclusion: SSPE is common in low-socioeconomic status. The profile of adult onset did not differ from childhood onset SSPE, except for a longer interval between measles infection and presence of the ophthalmic symptom as presenting feature in adult onset group.-
dc.publisherANNALS OF INDIAN ACADEMY OF NEUROLOGY-
dc.subjectNeurosciences & Neurology-
dc.titleSubacute sclerosing panencephalitis: A clinical appraisal-
Appears in Collections:Journal Articles

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