Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://dspace.sctimst.ac.in/jspui/handle/123456789/1123
Title: SURFACE MODIFICATION OF CORNEAL CONTACT-LENS WITH PHOSPHORYL CHOLINE BY GLOW-DISCHARGE
Authors: SUNNY, MC
SHARMA, CP
Keywords: Biocompatibility
Issue Date: 1991
Publisher: BIOMATERIALS ARTIFICIAL CELLS AND IMMOBILIZATION BIOTECHNOLOGY
Citation: BIOMATERIALS ARTIFICIAL CELLS AND IMMOBILIZATION BIOTECHNOLOGY. 19; 3; 599-612
Abstract: Polymers like poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) and poly(2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate) (PHEMA) are widely used in the development of hard and soft contact lenses. Cell adhesion and deposition of chemicals such as calcium, lipoproteins and mucin on the lens surface cause visual acuity which is the main problem in extended uses of contact occular lenses. In order to minimise the cell adhesion and other type of depositions, a method of surface modification of lens involving the use of phosphoryl choline, a phospholipid and the glow discharge technique has been described. The power variation of the lenses after modification has been checked using Topcon lensometer. The possible power changes of the modified samples due to the exposure to the normal light in the laboratory, darkness, ultraviolet (U.V.) light or saline have been investigated by taking the visible and ultra violet spectra using Beckman spectrophotometer. Surface energy variations after modifications of the samples have been checked by sessile drop water contact angle measurements. Glow discharge treatment increases the hydrophilicity of the samples. It seems, the modifications do not affect the power of hard contact lens significantly. It is also observed that the exposure of samples to the normal light in the laboratory, darkness, U.V. light or saline make no significant change in the visible and ultraviolet spectra of the samples before and after modification.
URI: http://dspace.sctimst.ac.in/jspui/handle/123456789/1123
Appears in Collections:Journal Articles

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