Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://dspace.sctimst.ac.in/jspui/handle/123456789/420
Title: EFFECT OF PLASMA GLOW, GLUTARALDEHYDE AND CARBODIIMIDE TREATMENTS ON THE ENZYMATIC DEGRADATION OF POLY(L-LACTIC ACID) AND POLY(GAMMA-BENZYL-L-GLUTAMATE) FILMS
Authors: CHANDY, T
SHARMA, CP
Keywords: Biomaterials
Issue Date: 1991
Publisher: BIOMATERIALS
Citation: BIOMATERIALS. 12; 7; 677-682
Abstract: The hydrolytic and enzymic degradation of poly(L-lactic acid) (PLA) and poly(gamma-benzyl L-glutamate) (PBGA) films, together with a series of surface treatments, were studied, as a function of exposure time. The degradation of these polymers was monitored by weight loss, contact angle, pH changes and tensile strength studies. Glutaraldehyde treatment retained the maximum strength of PLA in buffer, followed by carbodiimide, compared with control films. On the other hand, plasma glow reversed the effect. The ability of alpha-chymotrypsin, carboxypeptidase, ficin, esterase, bromelain and leucine aminopeptidase to modulate the degradation of PLA and PBGA was also investigated. Addition of these enzymes to the polymer-buffer system reduced the tensile strength of these polymers variably. Among the six enzymes studied, leucine aminopeptidase showed the highest enzymic effect on the degradation of the glutaraldehyde-treated and bare PLA or bare PBGA films. However, glutaraldehyde-cross-linked PLA demonstrated maximum stability in buffers or in all other enzyme systems studied compared with bare PLA. It is conceivable that surface treatments on these polymers might have altered their physical and chemical configuration and the subsequent degradation properties. Surface modifications may provide new ways of controlling the biodegradation of polymers for a variety of biomedical applications.
URI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0142-9612(91)90116-R
http://dspace.sctimst.ac.in/jspui/handle/123456789/420
Appears in Collections:Journal Articles

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