Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://dspace.sctimst.ac.in/jspui/handle/123456789/625
Title: INFLUENCE OF ANTIHYPERTENSIVE DRUGS AND STEROID-HORMONES ON PROTEIN ADSORPTION DESORPTION ON POLYCARBONATE
Authors: CHANDY, T
SHARMA, CP
Keywords: Biocompatibility
Issue Date: 1991
Publisher: ARTIFICIAL ORGANS
Citation: ARTIFICIAL ORGANS. 15; 3; 198-205
Abstract: To develop artificial materials for prolonged use in the vascular system, the complicated process of surface-induced thrombosis needs to be better understood. It is documented that certain antihypertensive drugs can inhibit platelet adhesion to an artificial surface; on the other hand, steroid drugs increase platelet surface attachment to variable degrees. This study demonstrates the changes in protein-surface binding with certain antihypertensive and antianginal drugs-namely, digoxin, sorbitrate, thyroxine, sembrina and hydralazine-and five steroid hormones-estrone, progesterone, beta-estradiol, 7(OH) progesterone, and testosterone-using trace labelling methods. It seems that the addition of these antihypertensive drugs to the polymer-protein system has increased the level of surface-bound albumin and reduced the fibrinogen surface concentration to variable degrees. A reversed pattern of protein-surface attachment has been evident with steroid hormones. Thus, it appears that the changes in platelet attachment due to various drugs may be dependent on the availability of fibrinogen receptors at the polymer interface, along with other possible biological factors. Prolonged use of antihypertensive drugs may not have any significant side effect for patients having an implant. However, the use of steroids or steroid-containing oral contraceptive agents may not be advisable for patients having an artificial implant in contact with blood. A better understanding of the mechanism of these drugs under in vivo conditions is needed to correlate these findings.
URI: http://dspace.sctimst.ac.in/jspui/handle/123456789/625
Appears in Collections:Journal Articles

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.