Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://dspace.sctimst.ac.in/jspui/handle/123456789/9331
Title: Assessment of micronuclei and chromosomal anomalies of five biocompatible materials in mice
Authors: Vaman, VSA
Tinu, SK
Geetha, CS
Mohanan, PV
Keywords: Environmental Sciences & Ecology; Toxicology
Issue Date: 2012
Publisher: TOXICOLOGICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMISTRY
Citation: 94 ,6;1225-1237
Abstract: In vivo genetic toxicology tests measure direct DNA damage or the formation of gene or chromosomal mutations, and are used to predict mutagenic and carcinogenic potential of compounds for regulatory purposes. These adverse genotoxic effects may be manifested in the form of gene mutations, structural chromosomal aberrations (CA), recombination, and numerical changes. The present investigation was carried to assess genotoxic effects of five different implantable biomaterials developed in different laborataries of Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute of Medical Sciences and Technology. All biomaterials were developed for clinical applications. CA and micronuclei (MN) studies are biomarkers of genotoxicity testing. Leachants from the extract of biomaterials are capable of inducing structural and numerical chromosomal changes. The studies were conducted in Swiss albino mice with the physiological saline extract of materials together with cyclophosphamide and physiological saline as positive and negative controls. Animals were administered intraperitoneally (ip) with a single injection of test, positive (cyclophosphamide), and negative (physiological saline) control and sacrificed after 24 or 48 h. Bone marrow cells were collected for CA and MN assays. Data showed that all five biomaterials did not significantly exert genotoxic effects. Hence, the study indicates that these biomaterials do not induce any chromosomal anomalies.
URI: 10.1080/02772248.2012.694999
http://dspace.sctimst.ac.in/jspui/handle/123456789/9331
Appears in Collections:Journal Articles

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